Old House of Keys

  • Wheelchair Access

The former home of the Manx Parliament and centre of 19th Century political life on the Isle of Man.  Animated portraits of Keys members and a simulated model of Mr Speaker bring the debating chamber to life.  The Secretary of the House welcomes you to join in the debates on law setting in this participatory experience.

Opening Times

Open Daily
1 Apr to 3 Nov 10 – 4

Daily debates

Admission

Free to view chamber outside debate times, donations welcome.

Join the debate:
Adults £6.00
Children £3.00

 

Concessions available:

  • Holiday Passes for multi-site admission
  • Group discounts available to pre-booked group visitors of 15 or more paying visitors. Pre-book in advance.
  • Free entry available to Isle of Man School children with a valid ACE card sponsored by Lloyds Bank.
  • Season Passes for Isle of Man residents
  • Go Heritage Explore Card available for multi-site admission and transport links
  • Free entry available to members of the Friends of Manx National Heritage, National Trust, English Heritage, CADW, Historic Scotland and organisations holding an agreement with Manx National Heritage.  Entry available to the named member only on presentation of a valid membership card.  Restrictions may apply.  For details, please consult your membership handbook.
  • Please note concessions may not apply for special events

About

Situated in Castletown

The Old House of Keys in Castletown was once the centre of 19th century political life on the Isle of Man.

The fascinating Old House of Keys building has been restored to its former appearance of 1866 – a milestone in Manx history when the old self-elected House of Keys took its first steps along the road to modern democracy by passing the House of Keys Election Bill and becoming a popularly elected body.

Join the Debate

You’ll meet the costumed secretary of this historic building before taking a seat in the finely restored debating chamber where you’ll enjoy an active debate on setting the laws of the Island. During your visit you’ll see how democracy developed in the Island – sometimes years ahead of England – and the effect that political decisions have had and continue to have on the Manx nation. Should motor racing be allowed on open roads? Should women get the vote? You decide!

Things to do an see

Don’t miss:

  • Visiting the current House of Keys in Douglas

Location

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